DNV GL

Shipping, Energy
NO: DNVR
Norway
DNV
Germanischer Lloyd

National Iranian Tanker Company (NITC) received two certificates from Norway’s DNV GL, an international accredited registrar and classification society, NITC’s Public Relations Department announced. The international body, which has 350 offices operating in more than 100 countries, granted NITC ISO 9001:2015 quality management system standard and ISO 14001:2015 environmental management system standard. (September 25, 2017).

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In September 2013 DNV and GL merged to become the world's leading ship and offshore classification society (Company Website). 

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"The Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines (IRISL) and the Norwegian international certification body and classification society, DNV GL, signed a cooperation agreement in Tehran. On the way to ease regular commute of Iranian vessels and ships from and to major international and European ports, the signed MOU requires DNV GL to issue international certifications for Iranian vessels after conducting legal inspections...The DNV GL director, underlined the necessity of expanding the bilateral ties between the two companies, vowing that his side will provide Iranian ships with quality services." (Tehran Times, "IRISL, Norwegian risk management company clinch MOU," 7/10/2016) 

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"In a letter sent to U.S. pressure group United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI) dated June 15 and seen by Reuters, GL said it had stopped offering services to the Islamic Republic of Iran Shipping Lines (IRISL) and the National Iranian Tanker Company (NITC). 'It is of the utmost importance that we maintain our good reputation,' GL said in the letter. 'Therefore, we have pursued the decision to cease rendering services to the Iranian companies mentioned... 'UANI, which includes former U.S. ambassadors on its board and is funded by private donations, had said GL's cover for IRISL was in violation of EU sanctions. Mark Wallace, UANI's chief executive and a former U.S. ambassador, welcomed GL's decision." (Reuters, "Iran feels heat as Europe ship classifiers halt work," 6/18/12)

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"Late last year, another leading classification society, Norway’s Det Norske Veritas, ended its relationship with Iran under U.S. pressure." (Washington Post, "Iran, unable to sell oil, stores it on tankers," 5/14/2012)

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"Det Norske Veritas (DNV), a leading ship-certification firm with 18 to 20 employees in Iran, is closing its office there, ending its inspections of Iranian vessels and sending 'termination notices' to 15 to 20 international oil rigs that are drilling in Iranian waters with DNV certification. 'Just looking at the political landscape and the political risk, we certainly don’t see it as a growth area, and we don’t want to be doing business with countries that don’t match with our own value statements,' DNV spokesman Blaine Collins said. 'So it was time to do this.' He said DNV thinks it has complied with international sanctions. U.S. lawmakers have seized upon DNV and a handful of similar firms as a new tool for tightening economic screws on Iran because of concern that the Middle East country might be building a nuclear weapon." (Washington Post, "Congress sees shipping-certification firms as tool to tighten Iran noose," 12/5/2011)

 

 

"DNV GL continually evaluates and updates our operations based on careful consideration of many various factors, including risks of the sort you highlight in your letter."