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Boeing

Boeing

Industry: 
Aerospace
Value of USG Contracts: 
2700
Symbol: 
NYSE:BA
States: 
IL
Country: 
USA
Sources: 

“U.S. planemaker Boeing has disclosed an agreement with Iran to provide airplane parts, relaxing a three-decade freeze in ties as part of a broader package of sanctions relief. The agreement sets out general terms and conditions for the ‘potential sale of certain goods and services related to the safety of flight,’ Boeing said in a regulatory filing. It marks the first acknowledged dealings between U.S. aerospace companies and Iran since the 1979 U.S. hostage crisis led to sanctions that deepened during the decade-old international dispute over Iran's nuclear program. Boeing said its agreement with state carrier Iran Air covered airplane parts, manuals, drawings, service bulletins, navigation charts and data. Boeing has also opened discussions with Iran Air Tours, a subsidiary of Iran Air, for similar goods and services, it said… In April, Boeing and engine maker General Electric said they had received licenses from the U.S. Treasury Department to export spare parts. European planemaker Airbus reiterated on Thursday that it had applied for a U.S. export license but said it had not yet reached an agreement with Iran on how to implement it.” (Reuters, Boeing reaches plane parts deal with Iran, 7/24/14)

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“However, Boeing Co, the world's biggest airplane maker, and engine maker General Electric Co said on Friday they had received licenses from the U.S. Treasury Department to sell certain spare parts for commercial aircraft to Iran under an interim deal agreed in November that went into effect on January 20…The preliminary deal provides for the sale of parts to Iranian flag carrier Iranair, whose fleet includes vintage Boeing and Airbus jetliners delivered as long ago as 1978…He said the license covered only components needed to ensure continued safe flight operations of older Boeing planes sold to Iran before the 1979 revolution, and did not allow any discussions about sales of new aircraft to Iran…A senior Iranian official told Reuters in November that Iran could require between 250 and 400 jets if and when sanctions are lifted completely.” (Reuters, “Iran aviation official in Vienna to discuss sanctions relief,” 4/8/14)

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“Boeing Co, the world's biggest airplane maker, and engine maker General Electric Co said on Friday they had received licenses from the U.S. Treasury Department to export certain spare parts for commercial aircraft to Iran under a temporary sanctions relief deal that began in January...A Boeing spokesman said his company received the license this week and would now contact officials in Iran to determine which parts were needed. He said the license covered only components needed to ensure continued safe flight operations of older Boeing planes sold to Iran before the 1979 revolution, and did not allow any discussions about sales of new aircraft to Iran. ‘It's very limited,’ said the spokesman. The sales would be the first acknowledged dealings between U.S. aerospace companies and Iran since the 1979 U.S. hostage crisis led to U.S. sanctions that were later broadened during the dispute over Iran's nuclear activities…Boeing said the license was granted under the temporary sanctions relief deal, and was aimed at helping improve the safety of Iran's aircraft. ‘We take the safety of flight issue very seriously,’ said the Boeing spokesman. He had no immediate details on how many parts would be sold to Iran, or their potential value. Analysts say the sales could help American companies position themselves for potential sales of new aircraft if a broader softening of sanctions is agreed. A senior Iranian official told Reuters in November that Iran could require between 250 and 400 jets if and when sanctions are lifted completely.” (Reuters, “Boeing, GE say get U.S. license to sell spare parts to Iran,” 4/5/14)

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“Multiple companies currently exploring new business ventures in Iran are also cashing in on highly lucrative contracts with the U.S. Defense Department, raising questions about whether their dealings with Iran could run afoul of U.S. law. At least 13 major international companies have said in recent weeks that they aim to reenter the Iranian marketplace over the next several months. The companies have received Pentagon contracts totaling well over $107 billion, according to a Washington Free Beacon analysis that tracked DoD contracts awarded since fiscal year 2009. Many of the companies, which include carmaker Renault and oil giants such as BP, have already sent high-level trade delegations to Tehran to meet with Iranian officials about striking new business deals…These companies include Boeing and General Electric—which have DoD contracts worth $87 and $12 billion respectively—as well as the Italian oil company Eni, Merck, Safran, Vitol, Bosch Rexroth, Sanofi Pastuer, and AVL.” (Washington Free Beacon, “Pentagon Contractors Exploring Business with Iran,” 2/25/14)

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"U.S. aerospace companies are seeking permission to sell airliner parts to Iran for the first time in three decades, in a key test of the temporary relief on sanctions given under talks to curtail Iran's nuclear activities. At least two leading manufacturers, Boeing and engine maker General Electric, have applied for export licenses in a six-month window agreed by Iran and six world powers in November, industry officials and other sources familiar with the matter said. If approved, the sales would be the first acknowledged dealings between U.S. aerospace companies and Iran since the 1979 U.S. hostage crisis led to sanctions that were later broadened during the dispute over Iran's nuclear activities…A source familiar with the matter said that Boeing, the world's biggest manufacturer of passenger jets, had also filed a request for permission to export parts to Iran. Boeing declined to comment, referring questions to the U.S. State Department, which in turn referred queries to the U.S. Treasury. A spokeswoman for the Treasury Department, which enforces international sanctions, declined to comment on specific license requests or applications.” (Reuters, “Exclusive: Testing detente, U.S. firms move to sell jet parts to Iran,” 2/21/14)

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"In January 2004, the nose-wheel of an Iran Air Boeing 747 passenger airplane collapsed on landing in Beijing. Iran Air and the Civil Aviation Administration of China agreed to use the French civil aviation agency to conduct the accident investigation. This license authorized Boeing to export an electronic data map that was needed by investigators to gain access to the information on the flight data recorder." (New York Times, "Licenses Granted to U.S. Companies Run the Gamut," 12/24/10)

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In a correspondance with the SEC in 2009, Boeing disclosed details of their contracts and activities in Iran.

“Boeing’s principal contacts with the Sanctioned Countries [Iran] consist of products and services solely related to the safe operation of Boeing commercial aircraft and to the launch of commercial communications satellites on behalf of a consortium in which Sudan has a minor participation.”

“ The contacts with the Sanctioned Countries [Iran] have been limited to flight safety and commercial satellite launch activities, the sale of exempted flight-related navigational materials and the provision of international trip planning services.”

“Contracts with Iran include:

 

  • Boeing and National Transportation Safety Board authorized to share EAR99 information with Iranian civil aviation authorities regarding a Kyrgyz Airlines B737 incident in Kyrgyzstan.
  • Boeing and National Transportation Safety Board authorized to share additional information with Iranian civil aviation authorities regarding a Kyrgyz Airlines B737 incident in Kyrgyzstan.
  • Pending request to assess safety-critical parts and services that may be needed to ensure the safe operation of Boeing aircraft in Iran.” 

 

(CORRESP for BOEING CO , 10/14/2009)

 

 

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