Boeing

Aerospace
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USA
Boeing

"Leaders from Boeing reportedly traveled to Tehran recently to meet and sign a deal with a top former Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps (IRGC) member who threatened to blow up U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf region, raising new questions about the U.S. aerospace company's continued efforts to ink multi-billion dollar deals with the Iranian regime. Representatives from Boeing traveled to Iran last month to meet with Hossein Alaei, CEO of Aseman Airlines, which is owned and controlled by the state. Boeing is moving forward with a $3 billion dollar deal to sell new planes to Aseman despite fierce opposition on Capitol Hill and direct evidence Iran has used commercial aircraft to ferry weapons and fighters across the region." (Washington Free Beacon, ""Boeing Reps Meet With Iranian Terror Leader Who Threatened to 'Destroy' U.S. Forces," 5/1/17).

"Boeing Co. is making "steady progress" to complete the terms of an 80-jetliner sale to Iran Air and expects to deliver the initial planes next year, the first U.S. aircraft exports to Iran since the country's revolution in 1979.  "That remains on track," Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg told reporters Monday following the planemaker's annual general meeting in Chicago. "It's really important that at every step of the process, we're working on this hand-in-hand with the U.S. government." The $16.6 billion deal with Iran Air and a separate $3 billion agreement with Iran Aseman Airlines bring two of President Donald Trump's initiatives into conflict: his campaign vows to "get tough" on Iran and his promise to bolster U.S. exports supporting thousands of manufacturing jobs." (Bloomberg, "Boeing Moves Ahead on Delivering First Jets To Iran Next Year," 5/1/17.

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"President Trump should cancel airplane sales to Iranian airlines that facilitate terrorism, a pair of Republican lawmakers urged Monday. 'Iran's commercial airlines have American blood on their hands,' Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., and Rep. Peter Roskam, R-Ill., wrote in a letter to Trump. A government decision to block the aircraft sales would provoke an uproar at home and abroad. It would cost Boeing, which has inked a pair of deals to sell 110 to Iran-based airlines, about $20 billion. It could deter American and European businesses from investing in Iran, which the regime's leaders have argued amounts to violation of the nuclear agreement that former President Barack Obama's team negotiated." (Washington Examiner, "Lawmakers To Trump: Cancel Obama-Backed Boeing Sales To Iran," 4/10/17).

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"IranAir may get its first new Boeing jetliner a year earlier than expected under a deal to take jets originally bought by cash-strapped Turkish Airlines, Iranian media and industry sources said. Iran had been expected to receive the first of 80 aircraft ordered from the U.S. planemaker in April 2018, but at least one brand-new aircraft is reported to be sitting unused because it is no longer needed by the Turkish carrier. Industry sources said Boeing was in negotiations to release at least one 777-300ER originally built for Turkish Airlines, which is deferring deliveries due to weaker traffic following last year's failed coup attempt in Turkey. Boeing said it never comments on talks with customers. The airlines involved were not immediately available for comment.  Iran's Deputy Roads and Urban Development Minister Asghar Fakhrieh-Kashan told the semi-official Mehr news agency the first Boeing 777 aircraft would reach Tehran within a month. It would be the first new U.S.-built jet delivered to Iran since the 1979 Islamic revolution." (Reuters, "IranAir May Receive First Boeing Jet Sooner Than Planned," 4/10/17).

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"Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., on Sunday said a new multi-billion dollar deal between Boeing and an Iranian airline 'should be canceled.' 'We should be increasing sanctions significantly on Iranian and Russian interests that are helping Assad. In particular, this Boeing deal should be canceled,' Rubio said. Last week, Boeing said it had agreed to sell $3 billion in airplanes to an Iranian airline, though President Trump could thwart the deal. Rubio also said Sunday he is 'concerned' about the Trump administration's Syria strategy following Secretary of State Rex Tillerson's comments about tackling the Islamic State before stabilizing Bashar Assad's country. The Foreign Relations Committee member is worried that new comments by Tillerson do not take the necessary steps against helping Syria and its allies." (Washington Examiner, "Rubio: Cancel Boeing deal to hurt Russia, Syria," 4/9/17).

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"Boeing Co. agreed to sell up to 60 of its most popular jets to an Iranian airline, doubling down on the country amid uncertainty over the Trump administration's tolerance for U.S. business dealings in Iran. Boeing said Tuesday it signed a memorandum of agreement with privately owned Iran Aseman Airlines for the sale of 30 Boeing 737 Max single-aisle planes, with options for another 30. The list price for all 60 jets is $6 billion. Plane makers typically offer steep discounts, and the real value of the deal could be significantly lower. Still, the sale is the first major deal between a U.S. company and an Iranian one since the inauguration of President Donald Trump, an outspoken critic of closer ties with Tehran. Boeing said it had received permission from the U.S. government to negotiate the sale, though it still needs signoff from the U.S. Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control. If approved, the first planes will arrive in Iran by 2022." (Wall Street Journal, "Boeing Agrees To First Plane Sale To Iran Under Trump," 4/4/2017).

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"The head of IranAir took delivery on Wednesday of the first new Western jet under an international sanctions deal... The 189-seat plane is the first of 100 ordered from Airbus following a deal reached in 2015 between Tehran and world powers to lift nuclear-related sanctions against Iran, in return for restrictions on the country's nuclear activities... The airline has also ordered 80 aircraft from Boeing and is expected to seal an order for 20 turboprops from Europe's ATR." (Reuters, "IranAir Takes Delivery of First Airbus Jet Post-Sanctions," 1/11/2017).

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"Iran said on Sunday it had negotiated to pay only about half the announced price for 80 new Boeing airliners in an order that the American planemaker had said was worth $16.6 billion... Despite Iran's great need for new planes to replace those from the sanctions era, it has entered the market at a time when Boeing, Airbus and smaller planemakers have all faced a downturn in orders, and are therefore expected to offer deep discounts." (Reuters, "Iran Says It's Getting Planes from Boeing at Half the Price," 1/1/2017).

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The landmark deal by Boeing Co. to sell planes to Iran faces a rocky flight path before the company can begin delivering the aircraft in 2018, experts say. The sale, priced as of Sunday at $16.6 billion, covers 80 aircraft, and the first deliveries would begin in 2018. The contract was reached within the terms of a U.S. government license issued to Boeing in September, the company said in a statement. But the sale is subject to a number of contingencies, including regulatory approvals, potential financing difficulties and other problems. Chief among them, the experts said, is the potential for the U.S. government, after the Donald Trump administration takes office, to revoke the licenses that authorized the sale in the first place. (Wall Street Journal, "Boeing Deal with Iran Faces Turbulence Before Delivery," 12/13/2016).

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"Aircraft maker Boeing Co is making progress on a deal to provide more than 100 commercial airplanes to Iran though none will be delivered in 2016, the company's top executive said on Tuesday... "We won't deliver any aircraft under that deal this year - these are deliveries that are a year, two, three downstream," Boeing Chief Executive Officer Dennis Muilenburg told reporters on the sidelines of a conference in Chicago on future technologies. "But it's significant opportunity for us and I'm pleased to see that we're making steady progress." ... Muilenburg said Boeing is "in the final stages of working through the deal structure with our customers in Iran" while also working through the U.S. government licensing process." (Reuters, "Boeing 'Making Progress' on Airplane Deal with Iran: CEO," 10/4/2016). 

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The U.S. government has given plane makers Boeing Co. and Airbus Group SE the all-clear to deliver jetliners to Iran Air in one of the highest-profile trade breakthroughs since nuclear sanctions were lifted on the Islamic Republic in January… Airbus on Wednesday said some of those deliveries may occur as early as this year, a spokesman said… Rep. Peter J. Roskam (R., Ill.), a critic of Iran plane deals, said, “There is a still a long way to go and many more hurdles to overcome before Iran can actually take delivery of these planes—and thankfully Congress is committed to making the process as difficult and expensive as possible.” Other obstacles remain, including plane financing. The U.S. approval “does not make the use of dollars significantly easier. So any financing will have to be in euro, already a challenge for a dollar-denominated asset,” said Bertrand Grabowski, managing director of aviation finance at DVB Bank SE. He added that government export credit agencies will have to play “a critical role for the first financing, there is no alternative.” That could be a challenge for Boeing. The U.S. government’s Export-Import bank, which can back plane deals, is restricted from supporting Iran-related transactions. Export credit agencies backing Airbus signaled they are ready to support a deal with Iran. (The Wall Street Journal, "U.S. Gives Boeing, Airbus Go-Ahead to Send Airliners to Iran," 9/21/2016).

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Asghar Fakhrieh Kashan, Iran’s deputy transport minister, announced on state TV that the Iranian regime intended to invite Boeing to Tehran to discuss the purchase of at least 100 airplanes. (Fortune, “Boeing Has Gotten an Invite From Iran to Talk Planes,” 3/4/2016).

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"Boeing Co is bullish on the Iranian market, believing that the Islamic republic's self-assessment for new aircraft is accurate. 'We've done a pretty good assessment on our side and we think the demand, should things open up, would be very strong,' Marty Bentrott, vice president - sales, Middle East, Russia & Central Asia at Boeing, told reporters in Dubai on Monday at the Arabian Travel Market (ATM). Iran has been barred by sanctions from buying western aircraft since the 1970s. But negotiations over its nuclear programme with the United States and other world powers that are set to come to close next month have raised hopes that the sanctions will be lifted. Last year, Iran's top aviation official said the country's airliners would need to order 400 aircraft over the next 10 years to replace its depleting and ageing fleet. Bentrott agreed that Iran's need for new aircraft 'would be in that ballpark'. In April 2014, Boeing was granted a license by the US Treasury Department to sells spare parts for commercial aircraft to Iran. The license has been extended on a number of occasions as the negotiations between Iran and the world powers progressed." (Gulf News, "Boeing bullish on Iran as nuclear negotiations near close," 5/4/15)

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"Iran says it has concluded three contracts with US aviation giant Boeing after it signed the Geneva nuclear agreement with the P5+1 group of countries in late 2013. Farhad Parvaresh, the CEO and Chairman of the country's flagship airline Iran Air, said on Saturday that the contracts with Boeing mostly involve repairing plane motors. 'Iran Air has so far received seven motors of its planes after they were repaired as the result of the contracts with Boeing,' Parvaresh said. 'There are several other motors that are being repaired by Boeing in a foreign country,' he said." (PressTv, Iran says three deals signed with Boeing," 2/25/15) 

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"Boeing said on Wednesday it had sold aircraft-related goods to Iran Air in the third quarter, marking the first acknowledged dealings between U.S. aerospace companies and Iran since the 1979 U.S. hostage crisis.The Chicago-based aerospace and defense company said in a filing that it sold aircraft manuals, drawings, navigation charts and data to Iran Air to help improve the safety of Iran's civil aviation industry. The sales did not include spare parts for aircraft, which were thought to be likely since Iran Air's fleet of planes includes vintage Boeing and Airbus jetliners delivered as long ago as 1978. Boeing and General Electric (GE.N) said in April that they had received export licenses from the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control allowing them to sell parts for commercial aircraft to Iran under a temporary sanctions relief deal that began in January." (ReutersBoeing books first sales to Iran since 1979, 10/22/14)

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“U.S. planemaker Boeing has disclosed an agreement with Iran to provide airplane parts, relaxing a three-decade freeze in ties as part of a broader package of sanctions relief. The agreement sets out general terms and conditions for the ‘potential sale of certain goods and services related to the safety of flight,’ Boeing said in a regulatory filing. It marks the first acknowledged dealings between U.S. aerospace companies and Iran since the 1979 U.S. hostage crisis led to sanctions that deepened during the decade-old international dispute over Iran's nuclear program. Boeing said its agreement with state carrier Iran Air covered airplane parts, manuals, drawings, service bulletins, navigation charts and data. Boeing has also opened discussions with Iran Air Tours, a subsidiary of Iran Air, for similar goods and services, it said… In April, Boeing and engine maker General Electric said they had received licenses from the U.S. Treasury Department to export spare parts. European planemaker Airbus reiterated on Thursday that it had applied for a U.S. exportlicense but said it had not yet reached an agreement with Iran on how to implement it.” (Reuters, Boeing reaches plane parts deal with Iran, 7/24/14)

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“However, Boeing Co, the world's biggest airplane maker, and engine maker General Electric Co said on Friday they had received licenses from the U.S. Treasury Department to sell certain spare parts for commercial aircraft to Iran under an interim deal agreed in November that went into effect on January 20…The preliminary deal provides for the sale of parts to Iranian flag carrier Iranair, whose fleet includes vintage Boeing and Airbus jetliners delivered as long ago as 1978…He said the license covered only components needed to ensure continued safe flight operations of older Boeing planes sold to Iran before the 1979 revolution, and did not allow any discussions about sales of new aircraft to Iran…A senior Iranian official told Reuters in November that Iran could require between 250 and 400 jets if and when sanctions are lifted completely.” (Reuters, “Iran aviation official in Vienna to discuss sanctions relief,” 4/8/14)

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“Boeing Co, the world's biggest airplane maker, and engine maker General Electric Co said on Friday they had received licenses from the U.S. Treasury Department to export certain spare parts for commercial aircraft to Iran under a temporary sanctions relief deal that began in January...A Boeing spokesman said his company received the license this week and would now contact officials in Iran to determine which parts were needed. He said the license covered only components needed to ensure continued safe flight operations of older Boeing planes sold to Iran before the 1979 revolution, and did not allow any discussions about sales of new aircraft to Iran. ‘It's very limited,’ said the spokesman. The sales would be the first acknowledged dealings between U.S. aerospace companies and Iran since the 1979 U.S. hostage crisis led to U.S. sanctions that were later broadened during the dispute over Iran's nuclear activitiesBoeing said the license was granted under the temporary sanctions relief deal, and was aimed at helping improve the safety of Iran's aircraft. ‘We take the safety of flight issue very seriously,’ said the Boeing spokesman. He had no immediate details on how many parts would be sold to Iran, or their potential value. Analysts say the sales could help American companies position themselves for potential sales of new aircraft if a broader softening of sanctions is agreed. A senior Iranian official told Reuters in November that Iran could require between 250 and 400 jets if and when sanctions are lifted completely.” (Reuters, “Boeing, GE say get U.S. license to sell spare parts to Iran,” 4/5/14)

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“Multiple companies currently exploring new business ventures in Iran are also cashing in on highly lucrative contracts with the U.S. Defense Department, raising questions about whether their dealings with Iran could run afoul of U.S. law. At least 13 major international companies have said in recent weeks that they aim to reenter the Iranian marketplace over the next several months. The companies have received Pentagon contracts totaling well over $107 billion, according to a Washington Free Beacon analysis that tracked DoD contracts awarded since fiscal year 2009. Many of the companies, which include carmaker Renault and oil giants such as BP, have already sent high-level trade delegations to Tehran to meet with Iranian officials about striking new business dealsThese companies include Boeing and General Electric—which have DoD contracts worth $87 and $12 billion respectively—as well as the Italian oil company Eni, Merck, Safran, Vitol, Bosch Rexroth, Sanofi Pastuer, and AVL.” (Washington Free Beacon, “Pentagon Contractors Exploring Business with Iran,” 2/25/14)

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"U.S. aerospace companies are seeking permission to sell airliner parts to Iran for the first time in three decades, in a key test of the temporary relief on sanctions given under talks to curtail Iran's nuclear activities. At least two leading manufacturers, Boeing and engine maker General Electric, have applied for export licenses in a six-month window agreed by Iran and six world powers in November, industry officials and other sources familiar with the matter said. If approved, the sales would be the first acknowledged dealings between U.S. aerospace companies and Iran since the 1979 U.S. hostage crisis led to sanctions that were later broadened during the dispute over Iran's nuclear activitiesA source familiar with the matter said that Boeing, the world's biggest manufacturer of passenger jets, had also filed a request for permission to export parts to Iran. Boeing declined to comment, referring questions to the U.S. State Department, which in turn referred queries to the U.S. Treasury. A spokeswoman for the Treasury Department, which enforces international sanctions, declined to comment on specific license requests or applications.” (Reuters, “Exclusive: Testing detente, U.S. firms move to sell jet parts to Iran,” 2/21/14)

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"In January 2004, the nose-wheel of an Iran Air Boeing 747 passenger airplane collapsed on landing in Beijing. Iran Air and the Civil Aviation Administration of China agreed to use the French civil aviation agency to conduct the accident investigation. This license authorized Boeing to export an electronic data map that was needed by investigators to gain access to the information on the flight data recorder." (New York Times, "Licenses Granted to U.S. Companies Run the Gamut," 12/24/10)

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In a correspondance with the SEC in 2009, Boeing disclosed details of their contracts and activities in Iran.

“Boeing’s principal contacts with the Sanctioned Countries [Iran] consist of products and services solely related to the safe operation of Boeing commercial aircraft and to the launch of commercial communications satellites on behalf of a consortium in which Sudan has a minor participation.”

“ The contacts with the Sanctioned Countries [Iran] have been limited to flight safety and commercial satellite launch activities, the sale of exempted flight-related navigational materials and the provision of international trip planning services.”

“Contracts with Iran include:

 

  • Boeing and National Transportation Safety Board authorized to share EAR99 information with Iranian civil aviation authorities regarding a Kyrgyz Airlines B737 incident in Kyrgyzstan.
  • Boeing and National Transportation Safety Board authorized to share additional information with Iranian civil aviation authorities regarding a Kyrgyz Airlines B737 incident in Kyrgyzstan.
  • Pending request to assess safety-critical parts and services that may be needed to ensure the safe operation of Boeing aircraft in Iran.” 

 

(CORRESP for BOEING CO , 10/14/2009)