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UANI in the News

Apr 13 2014
New York Times
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"Mark D. Wallace, the chief executive of United Against Nuclear Iran, an advocacy group in New York that has argued for far stricter sanctions, said the administration’s assurances had been 'wholly contradicted by reality.' The administration has contended that when averaged over six months, Iran’s oil exports will be closer to one million barrels a day."

Mar 17 2014
New York Times
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"'If President Putin goes ahead with his apparent intention to annex Crimea, we’re going to have to sanction Russia, and they are going to have to retaliate, and it’s really going to screw up the P5-plus-one negotiations with Iran,' said Gary Samore, a former senior aide on nonproliferation on the National Security Council in President Obama’s first term. He is now executive director for research at Harvard’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, as well as the president of United Against Nuclear Iran, a group that advocates strong sanctions against Iran until the nuclear dispute is resolved. The problem will be that Iran will feel much less pressured to make any concessions if they think the P5-plus-one are squabbling,' Mr. Samore said. 'The Iranians will be watching and waiting; they are not inclined to make any concessions anyway, but they are going to be less inclined until there is a resolution' of the situation in Ukraine."

Mar 16 2014
Vice
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"Not long ago, we received a press release that caught our eye — this is not a common occurrence — and was distributed by an NGO called United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI). Based in New York and headed by former US Ambassador to the United Nations Mark D. Wallace, UANI had photos of alleged criminals being hanged in front of spectators in the Iranian cities of Qaem Shahr and Babol. However, the condemned weren't hanging from traditional gallows. They were hanging from construction cranes that had one word painted on them: Atlas... According to UANI, its campaign has persuaded five large crane manufacturers to pull out of the Iranian market: Konecranes of Finland, UNIC and Tadano of Japan, Germany’s Liebherr, and most notably Connecticut’s Terex. Notable because the company's presidents have included both Filipov and his son Steve, and because the company claimed in 2011 that UANI didn't persuade them to stop doing business in Iran because they'd already stopped doing business in Iran."

Feb 26 2014
Reuters
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"Mark Wallace, chief executive of U.S. pressure group United Against Nuclear Iran, which seeks tougher sanctions, said Iran's economy was already benefiting from the sanctions relief. 'The Obama administration has stated that sanctions relief would only amount to $6 billion (£3.6 billion) to $7 billion, however the increase in oil sales alone has already been worth over $4 billion in new revenue for the regime,' said Wallace, a former U.S. ambassador to the U.N. 'If Iran's oil exports remain constant from now until July, the regime will have gained more than $14 billion in additional revenue post-Geneva, not including the various other economic benefits from sanctions-easing related to areas such as the petrochemicals, automotive and precious metals sectors.'"

Feb 20 2014
Huffington Post
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"Advocacy group United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI) called on chairman Fil Filipov to end the supply of cranes to the Middle Eastern state, however Filipov told the Washington Beacon on Thursday, 'We do not ship any cranes to this country,' adding that he had 'no idea' how the products ended up in Tehran."

Feb 19 2014
Bloomberg
Bloomberg

"This analysis does not make him a new pessimist or a harsh critic of the administration’s approach. Samore has never believed that the U.S., alone or in combination with other like-minded powers, could do anything but delay Iran’s nuclear program. A full-scale ground invasion could bring about the end of the Iranian nuclear program, but that is quite obviously not happening, and short of that, he says, there is no permanent fix. What we have now is, essentially, a truce for a truce. I sat down with Samore at his office at Harvard University -- where he is the executive director for research at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Government -- to discuss this next round of negotiations. Below is a lightly edited transcript.

Question: What would Iran have to agree to in order for these negotiations to work?

Answer: Iran would have to drastically limit the number of centrifuges they will have at Natanz, for starters. They could be dismantled, or disinstalled, or put in storage someplace, but a monitored storage. Basically, they would have to operate far fewer centrifuges than they currently have. We’re also talking about taking down their supply of low-enriched uranium, way below the seven or eight tons they have currently have that they have no need for. We’re talking about losing Qom, the famous Fordow facility inside a mountain. We’re talking about closing or converting the Arak heavy water research reactor, either shutting it or converting it to a low power light water reactor. And we’re talking about enhanced monitoring and verification... "

Feb 19 2014
Free Beacon
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"The photographs prompted the advocacy group United Against Nuclear Iran (UANI) to write Atlas Chairman Fil Filipov to demand that his company 'immediately terminate all business activities in Iran.'... Asked if it was false for UANI to claim that Atlas cranes are being utilized in executions, Filipov again responded, 'I have no idea.' When presented with UANI’s letter and photographic evidence purporting to show people hanging from Atlas cranes, Filipov dismissed the group as 'crazy people.' 'I have no time to deal with crazy people writing whatever without any substantiations … already work 20 hrs per day to keep the businesses afloat and!! [sic]' he wrote. UANI spokesman Nathan Carleton said Filipov should to be more accountable given Iran’s record of human rights abuses. 'It is regrettable that Mr. Filipov is not more concerned with this situation—it is a very serious matter,' Carleton told the Free Beacon. 'Instead of making such flippant responses, Mr. Filipov should explain how his cranes got to Iran and why there is an Iranian firm calling itself his business partner and using his logo.' UANI CEO Mark Wallace earlier this month called on Atlas to 'leave Iran.'"

Feb 14 2014
New York Times
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"'It is clear that the Geneva negotiations and the signing of the interim agreement significantly altered the outlook for Iran’s oil market and overall economy, due to both the easing of restrictions and the reduced risks for purchasers and traders,' said Mark D. Wallace, the chief executive of United Against Nuclear Iran, a group based in New York that has supported stronger sanctions."

Feb 14 2014
Free Beacon
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"'These numbers … cast doubt on the accuracy of the administration’s estimates for sanctions relief,' former Ambassador Mark Wallace, CEO of the advocacy group United Against Nuclear Iran, said in a statement. 'The $6 or $7 billion estimate does not take into account the tens of billions of dollars Iran will reap from increased oil sales.' 'It is becoming more and more evident that the Geneva deal provided Iran with disproportionate sanctions relief, in exchange for far less significant concessions regarding its nuclear program,' Wallace said. Iran currently has some 30 million barrels of crude oil stored on tankers, 'including 6 million barrels in vessels off China’s coast,' Iran’s state-run media reported. It produced 30,000 more barrels in January, bringing its total to around 2.78 million, according to the report."

Feb 13 2014
Bloomberg
Bloomberg

"The U.S. and its allies have demanded that Iran close an underground uranium-enrichment plant in Fordo, abandon its heavy-water reactor in Arak and impose limits on the amount of nuclear material it stockpiles, according to Samore, now a researcher at Harvard University who is also president of United Against Nuclear Iran, a New York-based advocacy group."